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It’s In Queens!

It’s In Queens! (May 17 to May 23)

There’s a great mix of classic and modern in the borough this week. Louis Armstrong, Tony Bennett, Leonard Bernstein, Dorothy and Toto are around. Ditto for completely new music, dance, poetry mashups, theater, and sculpture.

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Queens Botanical Garden

It’s In Queens! (May 17 to May 23)

 

There’s a great mix of classic and modern in the borough this week. Louis Armstrong, Tony Bennett, Leonard Bernstein, Dorothy and Toto are around. Ditto for completely new music, dance, poetry mashups, theater, and sculpture.

 

May 18, Global Mashup 3: Mexico meets Guinea, 8 pm. Banda de los Muertos plays the boisterous Mexican brass/contemporary music known as “banda.” Mandingo Ambassadors does music from the golden age of Guinean dance bands. Then the two groups jam together. Dance lessons at 7 pm. $16. Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Blvd., http://bit.ly/2IhubxK.

 

May 18, The Wizard of Oz, 7 pm. CinemaLIC kicks off its fifth season screening outdoor movies on a 30-foot inflatable screen with this classic. Free. Hunter’s Point South Park, vicinity of Center Boulevard and 48th Avenue, LIC, http://bit.ly/2IkVrvd.

 

May 18, The Life and Times of Louis Armstrong, 1 pm. Experts and archivists from the Louis Armstrong House Museum offer an insider’s view of Satchmo with rarely seen archival material, pictures, film, and recordings. Queens Library Glen Oaks, 256-04 Union Turnpike, http://bit.ly/2rI3lHL.

 

May 18-19, Take Root, 8 pm. New dances which introduce ideas of entropy and disorder with Brush/McGrath and Brynne Billingsley & Artists. $15 in advance. Green Space, 37-24 24th St., LIC, http://bit.ly/2qAdUME.

 

May 19, The Tragedy of Carmen, 7:30 pm (and May 20 at 2 pm). Queens Opera Theatre presents a modern adaptation of Bizet’s “Carmen,” a tale of doomed love and violent passion. $16. Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Blvd., http://bit.ly/2Gd6CUJ.

 

May 19-20, Traditions Festival, noon to 4 pm. This third annual festival brings together neighborhood traditions, past and present, with music, food, dance, art, crafts, and more. Free. King Manor Museum, 153-01 Jamaica Ave., Jamaica, http://bit.ly/2HLqfsE.

 

May 19, A Tribute to Scott Joplin, 2 pm. This annual concert honors the King of Ragtime near his gravesite. Dan Levinson and his Canary Cottage Dance Orchestra, back for their fourth appearance, perform Joplin’s music with vocals by the Victorian Vaudeville Barbershop Quartet. Free. St. Michael Cemetery, 72-02 Astoria Blvd. S., East Elmhurst, http://bit.ly/2Ine0Pg.

 

May 19, War Requiem, A Plea for Peace, 8 pm. The Queens College Choral Society performs Benjamin Britten’s “War Requiem,” which combines the traditional Latin Requiem text with the poems of Wilfred Owen, who died in World War I. $20. Colden Auditorium, vicinity of Horace Harding Expressway and Kissena Boulevard, Flushing, http://bit.ly/2KnJvti.

 

May 19, Percussia, 3 pm. This Queens-based ensemble presents voice, harp, and percussion. Free. Queens Library Woodhaven, 85-41 Forest Pkwy., http://bit.ly/2jHfBou.

 

May 19, Annual Spring History and Community Festival, 11 am to 4 pm. Learn about Flushing’s unique heritage via demonstrations, educational programs, and hands-on activities. Weeping Beech Park, Bowne Street and 37th Avenue, Flushing, 718-359-0528 or Bownehouse@verizon.net.

 

May 19, Queens Symphony Orchestra, 5 pm. Patriotic music by the borough’s oldest arts organization. Free. Colony Theater Center, 2 Reid Ave., Breezy Point, http://bit.ly/2Gfvprn.

 

May 19, The Oscar, 1 pm. Screened as part of a series on Hollywood films starring local actors, “The Oscar” is Tony Bennett’s first movie. Hear about his early days in Astoria and then watch him on the big screen. Free. Greater Astoria Historical Society, 35-20 Broadway, LIC, http://bit.ly/2jX9rAC.

 

May 19, Strategic Desire: The Story Poems Tell, 2:30 pm. This interactive workshop asks participants to craft poems that tell a story and act as witness. Allia Abdullah-Matta, an Associate Professor at CUNY LaGuardia Community College, leads. Lewis H. Latimer House Museum, 34-41 137th St., Flushing, http://bit.ly/2Ild9i0.

 

May 19, Dear Penelope, 8 pm. A reading of a developing comedic play about four women who fall from grace at a news corporation and are banished to the basement to write an advice column. They have one chance to get their old jobs back. All they have to do is hijack the most spectacular story of the year. Queens Theatre, 14 United Nations Ave. S., Flushing Meadows Corona Park, http://bit.ly/2Hq9Mdy.

 

May 20, Oratorio Society of Queens, 4 pm. A 125-plus-member chorus sings Leonard Bernstein’s “Chichester Psalms,” selections from “West Side Story,” and Americana favorites. Queensborough Performing Arts Center, 222-05 56th Ave., Bayside, http://bit.ly/2wD7uTb.

 

May 20, Quintet of the Americas, 4 pm. The borough’s renowned woodwind quintet presents “Americans in Paris and Back Again,” a program that explores teacher Nadia Boulanger’s influence on 20th century American composers. Queens Botanical Garden, 43-50 Main St., Flushing, http://bit.ly/2rHgf9Y.

 

May 20, Fertile Ground, 7 pm. A showcase for new and evolving work plus a post-performance discussion with wine. Green Space, 37-24 24th St., LIC, http://bit.ly/2qAdUME.

 

May 21, Queens Symphony Orchestra, 7 pm. Broadway show tunes by the borough’s oldest arts organization. Free. Nativity of the Blessed Virgin May, 101-41 91st St., Ozone Park, http://bit.ly/2Gfvprn.

 

May 22, Australian Classical Guitar, 7:30 pm. As part of the East River Guitar Series, Rupert Boyd makes a solo stop on his world tour. $20 cash only. Annable Basin Sailing, 4-40 44th Dr., LIC, http://bit.ly/2rGIIvO.

 

May 23, Xaviera Simmons: Convene, Aug. 19. This sculpture features aluminum canoes painted with designs that evoke national flags symbolic of the diverse historical and contemporary demographic makeup of Astoria and Long Island City. It is temporarily on land along the East River in Hunter’s Point South Park, vicinity of Center Boulevard and 51st Avenue, LIC, http://bit.ly/2IH6ySs.

 

Continuing programs

 

Queens New Music Festival, until May 20. This seventh annual festival features Queens College New Music Group, RAM Players, Bowers-Fader Duo, Blagoeva-Massicotte Duo, The New Music for Strings Festival, and The Resurgam Quartet. Secret Theatre, 44-02 23rd St., LIC, http://bit.ly/2IlfZ6M.

 

Panorama Europe, until May 31. Screenings of fiction and documentary works that present a portrait of contemporary Europe. Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35th Ave., Astoria’s Kaufman Arts District, http://bit.ly/2raFG2p.

 

LIC Arts Open, until May 20. Throughout the week, Astoria and LIC venues of varying sizes fill halls with every conceivable form of art work. On the final two days, from noon to 6 pm, artists open the doors to their studios and welcome the public. Free, http://bit.ly/2K0Ubhn.

 

Bring It On The Musical, until May 19. Tonya Pinkins, who co-starred with Gregory Hines in the Broadway play “Jelly’s Last Jam,” directs this musical. May 17 at 11:30 am; May 18 at 11:30 am and 8 pm; May 19 at 8 pm. $25. Black Spectrum Theatre, Roy Wilkins Park, 177th Street and Baisley Boulevard, Jamaica, http://bit.ly/2oGkPUC.

 

Milka Djordjevich ANTHEM, until May 26. This piece questions contemporary dance’s predisposition towards neutrality, authenticity and the de-sexualization of the female body. It weaves together existing and imagined vernacular dance styles to explore labor, play, and feminine-posturing. Wednesdays through Saturdays at 8 pm. $20. The Chocolate Factory, 5-49 49th Ave., LIC, http://bit.ly/2wEcve9.

 

The “It’s In Queens” column is produced by the Queens Tourism Council with the hope that readers will enjoy the borough’s wonderful attractions. More info at www.itsinqueens.com.

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It’s In Queens!

LOUIS ARMSTRONG’S “WHAT A WONDERFUL WORLD

hree Queens-based organizations collaborate to bring the legacy and music of Armstrong into all 62 branches of the Queens Library System

April 23, 2017: Queens Library has joined forces with Louis Armstrong House Museum and theKupferberg Center for the Arts @ Queens College to launch a systemwide celebration of the 50th Anniversary of Armstrong’s “What a Wonderful World” in all 62 branches of the library with free workshops, concerts, lectures, video, and surprise events between now and June 30th.

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Louis Armstrong

LOUIS ARMSTRONG’S “WHAT A WONDERFUL WORLD”
50TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATED IN BOROUGH-WIDE INITIATIVE

Three Queens-based organizations collaborate to bring the legacy and music of Armstrong into all 62 branches of the Queens Library System

April 23, 2017: Queens Library has joined forces with Louis Armstrong House Museum and theKupferberg Center for the Arts @ Queens College to launch a systemwide celebration of the 50th Anniversary of Armstrong’s “What a Wonderful World” in all 62 branches of the library with free workshops, concerts, lectures, video, and surprise events between now and June 30th.

“There’s so much in ‘Wonderful World’ that brings me back to my neighborhood where I live in Corona, New York,” Armstrong said in 1968. “Lucille and I, ever since we’re married, we’ve been right there in that block. And everybody keeps their little homes up like we do and it’s just like one big family. I saw three generations come up on that block. And they’re all with their children, grandchildren, they come back to see Uncle Satchmo and Aunt Lucille. That’s why I can say, ‘I hear babies cry/ I watch them grow/ they’ll learn much more/ then I’ll never know.’ And I can look at all them kids’ faces. And I got pictures of them when they was five, six and seven years old. So when they hand me this ‘Wonderful World,’ I didn’t look no further, that was it.”

With a grant from the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, Queens Library, the Louis Armstrong House Museum and Kupferberg Center for the Arts @ Queens College have curated a program comprised of multiple opportunities to celebrate Louis Armstrong’s music, history, and belief in “listening to all kinds of music.” Performances include lectures by staff and LAHM (include Spanish) and 12 performances by world-class musicians who reflect the diversity of cultures and communities who make up the fabric of Queens. Special arts activities include collage making and other opportunities for participants to share what “makes their world wonderful,” and what makes Queens a wonderful world. A video about the song’s history and its relationship with the political and social upheaval of the 1960s will be shown in select branches. In addition, programming includes pop-up concerts in all branches.

“While the song reflects Louis Armstrong’s feelings about the neighborhood of Corona and borough of Queens, it also applies to the way many of our customers experience our libraries,” said Queens Library President and CEO Dennis M. Walcott. “It speaks to the joy of discovery and the satisfaction of learning that occurs each time people come to us for information that helps them succeed in their lives. Our partnership with Kupferberg Center for the Arts @ Queens College and the Louis Armstrong House Museum offers a great opportunity for everyone who visits our library locations to absorb Satchmo’s optimism and reinforce his sense of wonder about the world.”

“We are thrilled to be working with the Queens Library to bring ‘What a Wonderful World’ programming to all 63 library branches in the borough and in turn make the arts more accessible to everyone in Queens,” says Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “What better way to communicate our College’s mission to serve the students and families of our borough than through a celebration of one of America’s (and Queens’!) most-beloved cultural icons?”

“The Louis Armstrong House Museum is thrilled to be sharing the legacy of the GREAT Louis Armstrong throughout the borough of Queens and beyond the neighborhood of Corona he loved so much where the museum is based,” says David Ostwald, Chairman of the LAHM Board and Leader of the Louis Armstrong Eternity Band.

This year’s celebration features a selection of exciting musical artists, each drawing inspiration from Louis Armstrong and underlining his influence worldwide. Highlights include David Ostwald’s Grammy-nominated, traditional New Orleans-style group, Louis Armstrong Eternity Band; Min Xiao-Fen’s reinterpretations of jazz classics in “Blue Pipa: From Harlem to Shanghai and Back;” Indian-inspired jazz from composer and guitarist Prasanna; pan-African percussion/vocal groupAkoko Nante Ensemble; folk band Radio Jarocho mixing the sounds of the Mexican countryside with New York City jazz; and, a series of lectures from experts and archivists from Louis Armstrong House Museum (in both English and Spanish) across Queens.

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LEGO Brick Fest

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April 7, LEGO Brick Fest, April 8. Get inspired, educated, and entertained with a ridiculous amount of LEGOs. Woody, a seven-foot-tall model of a Toy Story character made of LEGO bricks, will be there. Ditto for Neon City, Glow Gallery, Floorsaic, Big Brick Pit, Space Station, and Architecture Zone. New York Hall of Science, 47-01 111st St., Flushing Meadows Corona Park, http://bit.ly/2EdfdWJ.

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Fashion in Film Festival – Wearing Time: Past, Present, Future, Dream

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Romy Schneider in THE INFERNO UNSEEN (2017), a new edit of rushes from Henr-Georges Clouzot's unfinished film "The Inferno" (L'Enfre) (1964). Opening night film of Fashion in Film Festival – Wearing Time: Past, Present, Future, Dream at Museum of the Moving Image, April 6, 2018. Image courtesy of Lobster Films.

April 6, Fashion in Film Festival, April 22. The program features some of the most visually stunning and stylistically adventurous films ever made. Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35th Ave., Astoria’s Kaufman Arts District

Guest curators: Marketa Uhlirova and Tom Gunning

Fashion’s most intimate relationship is its relation to time.—Barbara Vinken

Fashion, measure of time.—Walter Benjamin

The London-based Fashion in Film Festival’s 10th anniversary season explores the fascinating connections between fashion, cinema, and time. Probing into four different (though often overlapping) conceptions of time—past, present, future, and dream—the program asks what concrete manifestations of time fashion and clothing enable. What memories, echoes, and ghostly shadows? Fashion’s own relation to time may be vital and intimate, but it is far from transparent. Film, the art of time passing, helps illuminate some of its complexities.

Few things indicate history to us as immediately as styles of dress—period films are often referred to as costume dramas. At the same time, fashion is one of the most potent visual means through which film can break away from known reality and herald new worlds of tomorrow. But dress and fabric can also embody the passage of time. Fashion in film has always been an important sign-posting device, deployed in multiple ways: to guide the viewer through time, to confuse, deceive, and disorient them, or even to dress the wounds of time. Examining the idea of clothing as a vehicle for representing time, Wearing Time goes beyond this, foregrounding the sense of invoking the past, present and future by donning its clothing. Dress allows us to wear time, even as time wears us out. http://bit.ly/2GqvgpS

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